1 day tour overview
Our 1-day Arusha National Park safaris packages was designed to offer visitors, with a free day on hand, a choice between two different (Arusha National Park or Tarangire) 1-day wildlife safaris. Do you have a free day, maybe before or after a Kilimanjaro trekking adventure, or are you waiting for a flight to your next destination? These 1-day African safaris provide just the answer for you, to get a brief but unforgettable African wildlife safari experience in one of two Tanzanian National Parks. Packages for our 1-day safaris to any of the abovementioned two Tanzanian National Parks can be arranged to start from Moshi/Arusha town.
Arusha National Park
Non game-viewing travel time: 1 hour
Distance: 60 km

After breakfast you are met by our professional tour guide/driver, who will deliver a short safari info briefing, after which we travel east to the Arusha National Park. This small but beautiful Tanzanian National Park is the closest national park to both the famous Arusha “safari town” (30 km) as well as the Kilimanjaro International Airport, thus making it ideal for 1-day safaris or tours. Not only is the animal life in the park abundant, but it is also one of the most beautiful and topographically varied parks in Tanzania. The park’s three most significant features include the rugged Mount Meru (Tanzania’s second highest peak at 4566m), the notably different coloured Momela Lakes, and the 3km wide Ngurdoto Crater, which was formed about fifteen million years ago! We will enjoy lunch at the Momela wildlife lodge and do an exciting morning game drive and afternoon game drive, visiting both the Momela Lakes and the Ngurdoto Crater. Wildlife which could be seen include African buffalos, elephants, hippos, giraffe, warthogs, antelopes, zebras, blue monkeys and sometimes a rare leopard or hyena. Late afternoon we depart for Arusha where we will end our safari adventure. The group should tip the tours guide around $20 for the day. You will be taken to your hotel, which ends our tour package services.

Tarangire National Park
Non game-viewing travel time: 4 hours
Distance: 240 km

After breakfast you are met by our professional tour guide/driver, who will deliver a short safari info briefing, after which we travel east to the Tarangire National Park. The park runs along the line of the Tarangire River and is mainly made up of low-lying hills on the Great Rift Valley floor. Its natural vegetation mainly consists of Acacia woodland and giant African Baobab trees, with huge swamp areas in the south. Both the river and the swamps act like a magnet for wild animals, during Tanzania’s dry season. The Tarangire National Park is reputed to contain some of the largest elephant herds in Africa. We will enjoy a picnic lunch inside the park and do two exciting morning and afternoon game drives, along the Tarangire River. Late afternoon we depart forMoshi where we will end our safari adventure. You will be taken to your hotel, which ends our tour packages services.

Departure dates

The departure dates for all our African safaris and trekking packages are totally flexible according to your own personal needs. Please contact us for further and more detailed info, as well as information on photographic safaris and Kilimanjaro trekking packages.

Hiking

Hiking is the preferred term, in Canada and the United States, for a long, vigorous walk, usually on trails (footpaths), in the countryside, while the word walking is used for shorter, particularly urban walks. On the other hand, in the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Ireland, the word “walking” is acceptable to describe all forms of walking, whether it is a walk in the park or backpacking in the Alps.

The word hiking is also often used in the UK, along with rambling (a slightly old-fashioned term), hillwalking, and fell walking (a term mostly used for hillwalking in northern England). The term bushwalking is endemic to Australia, having been adopted by the Sydney Bush Walkers club in 1927. In New Zealand a long, vigorous walk or hike is called tramping. It is a popular activity with numerous hiking organizations worldwide, and studies suggest that all forms of walking have health benefits.

Jungle Safari

A safari is an overland journey, usually a trip by tourists in Africa. In the past, the trip was often a big-game hunt, but today, safaris are often to observe and photograph wildlife—or hiking and sightseeing, as well.

In 1836 William Cornwallis Harris led an expedition purely to observe and record wildlife and landscapes by the expedition’s members. Harris established the safari style of journey, starting with a not too strenuous rising at first light, an energetic day walking, an afternoon rest then concluding with a formal dinner and telling stories in the evening over drinks and tobacco. The hunting aspect traditionally associated with the safari is said to have its origins in the early 1800s in the region of Évora, Alentejo, where villagers got together to hunt wild boar and reclaim land for farming.